News

Hire a Contractor or an Employee?

Independent contractors and employees are not the same, and it's important to understand the difference. Knowing this distinction will help you determine what your first hiring move will be and affect how you withhold a variety of taxes and avoid costly legal consequences. ...




The Surprising Truth About Older Workers

Here’s one: Their strengths can make them the most valuable people in the office
 
When Mark Simoneau finally landed a job interview last October, he had to borrow a car to get there. His rusty 16-year-old Mercury Grand Marquis needed a new transmission.
 
You might say Simoneau was rusty, too: He'd been either out of work or underemployed for four years. ...




4 Ways to Get New Employees Off on the Right Foot

Here are his tips to super-charge a new employee's first day:
 
1. Share a taste of the culture. The weeks between "You're hired!" and the employee's first day can be used to get the individual used to the company's culture and expectations. ...




Why you may want to consider a ‘napping room’

Employers spend vast amounts of time and resources combating costly chronic conditions like diabetes, heart disease and obesity — and rightly so. But there’s one health condition that’s largely ignored by health-management programs. — and it’s likely having a negative impact on your employees. ...




Predictable Scheduling Laws: The Next Trend in Workplace Regulations

Seattle will likely be the next city to limit employers’ use of on-call scheduling
 
Inconsistent work-scheduling practices—such as "just-in-time" or on-call scheduling—in the retail and restaurant industries have led some cities to pass or consider laws that provide more stability for workers. ...




How You Reject a Job Candidate Defines Your Recruitment Strategy

In organization's HR team can create advocates out of any applicant—even the rejected ones—by ensuring each candidate has a positive experience. But too many organizations ignore, or blunder through the potentially unpleasant part of the recruitment process in which hopeful candidates must be told "Thanks, but no thanks. ...




A question to ask yourself about iffy job candidates

The next time you come across a resume that doesn’t quite knock your socks off, there’s a question you may want to ask yourself before digging deeper into the pile.  
 
The question: If the “iffy” candidate’s degree had come from a higher-profile university, or their work experience had fewer gaps, would you then bring the person in for an interview?
 
If your answer is “yes,” Regina Hartley, vice president of HR at UPS, thinks you should probably bring that person in for a chat. ...




Help Your Employees Save for Retirement by Educating Them

Saving for retirement is an important consideration for workers of any age. But your employees may not be taking the proper steps to secure their future — because they don't know any better.
 
A recent survey of 1,000 U.S. employees by Ramsey Solutions, which provides personal finance education, found that 40 percent of workers, including 70 percent with zero retirement savings, have no access to any type of employer-sponsored information about retirement or finances. ...




Women In The Workplace: Three Questions To Ask Your Leaders

As a mother of a professional working daughter, the under-representation of women at every level of the workforce concerns me. Women are 33% more likely to gain a college degree than men, and make up 47.5% of the country’s labor force, yet the gender gap remains.
 
In 1972 Katherine Graham of the Washington Post Company became the first female CEO of a Fortune 500 firm. ...




This is How You Create the Ideal Millennial Workplace

Millennial workers are a breed of their own. Having grown up alongside some of the same tech tools we use today and in the shadow of life-changing events like 9/11 and the Great Recession, they’re no stranger to change, technology or innovation. And employers want them on their team. ...